Chasing God's glory through tragedy and triumph

2017 December

Behold the Savior: Remembering Heaven as part of Christmas

Posted by | behold, christmas, family life, fear, finishing well, grief, sharing faith, Stories | No Comments

The following is the final piece of a four-part Advent devotional I created in December as a gift for my readers.

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The other night we piled in the car with our jammies on and took the kids on a drive down Christmas Tree Lane. This iconic Christmas light show has been operating for 95 years in our city of Fresno. As we were inching down the two-mile-long lane, my 6-year-old Zayla squealed with delight. “Mama, mama, look!” I heard her say. “It’s the Activity Scene.”

We all giggled when we saw her pointing at this beautiful wooden Nativity Scene lit up in front of one of the houses. It was so cute I didn’t even bother correcting her.

After all, there was a lot activity in that scene. And there’s lots of activity in this season. If we don’t take time to pause and ponder these things in our hearts, we might miss the wonder of it all. We could miss the heart of Christmas, which we have been anticipating and awaiting all month long.

Over the last three weeks of Advent, I have invited you to Behold the Creator, Behold the Good News and Behold the Christ Child with me. My prayer has been that this Behold devotional would provide a fresh lens for us to see Advent. Friends, what we behold reveals our hearts.

This is the fourth week of Advent, but also a unique year because Christmas Eve falls on the final Advent Sunday. Let’s lean in close and remember why there is so much activity to behold in the scene. This baby laying in a rustic, uncomfortable manger was born with one main purpose: to be our Savior.

All of the Bible points to the coming of this Savior. By some estimates, there are more than 300 Old Testament passages that talk about the coming Messiah in great detail. The Jews waited for hundreds of years for this promise to be fulfilled. In Luke 19, Jesus speaks his purpose again: “For the Son of Man came to seek and to save the lost.” (Luke 19:10). Jesus was a promise fulfilled to all of us.

All the details are right there in the Christmas story, according to Luke, when the angel visited the shepherds in the fields: “And the angel of the Lord appeared to them and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were filled with great fear. And the angel said to them, ‘Fear not, for behold, I bring you good news of great joy that will be for all the people. For unto you is born this day in the city of David, a Savior, who is Christ the Lord’” (Luke 2:9-11).

Many of us who have grown up in Christian churches could probably recite these verses from memory. We have heard and read these scriptures dozens of times. We continue to sing the Christmas carols that tell the miraculous story. This passage in Luke is at once a gentle whisper and a loud anthem, reminding us we do not need to fear for the good news is our Savior has come.

The message repeated could become rote or it could serve as the most important daily reminder: Every one of us needs a savior.

Are you battling fear today?

Maybe you are fearful someone will find out about your sin and your shortcomings. Maybe you are fearful you are not good enough. Maybe you are fearful to embrace joy after the death of a loved one. Maybe you are fearful about your future or the future of your children.

I have been there.

Every time I am tempted to succumb to fear, the words of the angel wash over me. Fear not, for behold the good news that God sent His one and only son to be our Savior. I don’t want to have amnesia on this point. I don’t ever want to forget why I desperately need a Savior.

This is the fourth Christmas my husband has spent in Heaven. My mother-in-law and I were having lunch the other day and talking about how amazing Christmas must be in the presence of God. As much as we deeply miss our Ericlee, we do not wish for him to come back to earth. He has a new glorious body free from cancer and the sin of this world. He is relishing eternity with his Savior. We will join him there one day.

And this, my friends, is why we all need a savior. Our citizenship is in heaven. We are to behold Heaven as an integral part of Christmas. When the Savior was born and then died and rose again, we were all given a chance to unwrap the gift of grace.

The Apostle Paul reminds us in Philippians that we are to long for Heaven. He writes, “But our citizenship is in heaven. And we eagerly await a Savior from there, the Lord Jesus Christ, who, by the power that enables him to bring everything under his control, will transform our lowly bodies so that they will be like his glorious body.” (Philippians 3:20-21, NIV).

Behold, Jesus is our Savior. He came to reveal God and all His glory to us. He came to rescue the exploited, to revive the weary, to restore the brokenhearted, to reclaim the marginalized and redeem all who believe. He will take us to Heaven one day for the grandest Christmas celebration.

Italian Pizzelle cookies: Mixing up sweet memories

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One of my favorite Christmas traditions is making Italian pizzelle cookies. My mom always made them for our teachers and friends when we were growing up. She learned from her mom, who is in Heaven. Now my daughters love making them too. These show-stopper cookies are light and buttery with a dusting of powdered sugar that makes them look like snowflakes. ❄️

The last few years my kids have sold them to raise money for different non-profits around the globe. We even have created a gluten-free version that I think are better than the original! ❄️

This year we decided to be more intentional about reaching out to our neighbors so we are going caroling Sunday and delivering these in little packages. (Just finished 13 dozen – not including all the ones we ate, of course!) ❄️

My sister Caron and nephew Gio are here from Washington to help with the pizzelles too! So fun! ❄️

Do you have a traditional cookie you make at Christmas? I’d love to hear about it!

Gluten-free Pizzelles Ingredients:

-3 large eggs

-1 1/2 teaspoon vanilla  extract

-2 teaspoon baking powder

-1/2 cup butter (1 stick, melted)

-3/4 cup granulated organic sugar

-1 1/4 cups + 2 tablespoons gluten-free flour (I like Trader Joe’s blend. I add an additional 2 tablespoons to make the consistency of the batter correct.)

-1/2 cup almond meal (I also use the Trader Joe’s brand of this, but there are other options.)

-1/2 teaspoon xanthan gum

-2 teaspoons baking powder

**powdered sugar to dust the tops of the cookies

Directions:

  1. Plug in pizzelle iron to heat up while mixing the ingredients.
  2. Melt butter and set aside to cool.
  3. Beat eggs. Gradually add sugar while beating.  Continue to beat, adding vanilla and cooled butter.
  4. Sift flour, almond meal, xanthan gum and baking powder into mixture as you beat.
  5. Use two spoons to put a rounded spoonful of mixture into the middle of each grid pattern on the hot pizzelle iron.
  6. Cook about 20-30 seconds or until lightly golden.
  7. Lay on cookie rack to cool.

Makes about 3 1/2 dozen.

**Variations:  Other flavorings may replace vanilla, such as pineapple, orange, mint, or almond.  Sometimes the amount may be increased to 1 tablespoon, according to taste.  For chocolate pizzelles, add 3 tablespoons cocoa and 1/4 cup sugar in place of the vanilla.

Book Review: Daring to Hope

Posted by | behold, book reviews, brave, compassion, courage, death, grief, kids, serve, sharing faith, social justice, world travel | No Comments

I still remember reading Katie’s Davis’ first book Kisses From Katie. I was sitting under a mosquito net in the stifling heat of a Haiti summer. My husband and I were operating a non-profit at the time. We had three daughters chasing each other through the mission house and a host of Haitian children playing in the yard. Reading about Katie’s life raising a dozen adopted girls in Uganda and starting a non-profit as a single woman, gave me just the spoonful of brave I needed to wade through the hard stuff.

Her words were my lifeline, my inspiration, my challenge to keep on keeping on. That was four years ago. Almost a different lifetime ago for both Katie and me.

The other day a friend texted me. “You have to read Daring to Hope by Katie Davis. I can’t put it down, reminds me of you.”

I went straight to Amazon and ordered it. I knew I needed her words again.

The book asks this critical question: How do you hold on to hope when you don’t get the ending you asked for?

This is a question I’ve asked myself dozens upon dozens of times in the last three years since my husband graduated to heaven. Katie is a hope writer like me. She is always chasing hope, always looking for God’s glory in unexpected places.

Although Daring to Hope could be considered a sequel to her first book, this book also stands alone. It’s a book about holding on to hope when you’re bone-weary and broken. Katie’s poignant storytelling and vulnerable sharing invites readers in. She grapples with the death of a friend, the sickness of many in her community, the suffering of her children. She walks a tightrope across life and death and still manages to embrace the extraordinary in the ordinary. She returns again and again to God’s Word and her purpose to give Him glory.

“Slowly, I was beginning to understand that it wasn’t my productivity that God desired; it was my heart,” writes Katie. “It wasn’t my ministry God loved; it was me. God was glorified, isglorified when we give Him our hearts, give Him ourselves, and faithfully do the thing right in front of us, no matter how small or trivial.”

That’s a big statement coming from a woman who experienced a lot of large things in her young life. She had a large family and directed a large ministry called Amazima. She led a large team of staff and volunteers to serve more than a thousand families.

This book reminded me that grief always gives way to the joy, that death always holds a promise of new life. I love the way Katie unfolds her love story, which again is a story brimming with hope.

Katie’s version of hope is never cheesy or far-fetched. It’s gritty, and sometimes a little bloody, and always redemptive. As she so beautifully sums up, her “scars whisper of His glory.”

**Thank you for reading today! If you’re interested in more of my book reviews, click HERE. I always share about books that touch me deeply and help me wade through grief to His glory.